Cthulhu

Call of Cthulhu is a horror roleplaying game using the Basic Roleplaying system and based upon the writings of Howard Phillips Lovecraft and a few others. Lovecraft wrote during the 1920s and 1930s, and he became a cult figure before dying in 1937. Since then his stature as an author has grown, and now he is generally recognized as the major American horror-story writer of the twentieth century.

Call of Cthulhu uses the Basic Role-Playing system used by other Chaosium games (first seen in RuneQuest). For as long as they stay functionally healthy and sane, characters grow and develop. Call of Cthulhu does not use levels, but is completely skill-based, with player characters getting better with their skills by succeeding at them. They do not, however, gain "hit points" and do not become significantly harder to kill.

A terrifying World War Two setting for the Call of Cthulhu & Savage Worlds roleplaying games. The Secret War has begun!

Cthulhu Britannica: Fully licensed by Chaosium Inc, brings the Cthulhu Mythos to the British Isles.

Includes titles such as the ENNIE award winning Shadows over Scotland, Avalon and Folklore.

Set throughout the globe and torn from the pages of the hidden history of the world, Age of Cthulhu adventures bring new secrets and mind-bending horrors to your 1920's Call of Cthulhu game. Each adventure comes with copious player handouts, detailed maps, and pre-generated investigators ready to risk their lives and their sanity to confront the horrors of an uncaring universe.

The Darkest RPG

 

For those grounded in the RPG tradition, the very first release of Call of Cthulhu created a brand new framework for table-top gaming. Rather than the traditional format established by Dungeons & Dragons, which often involved the characters wandering through caves or tunnels and fighting different types of monsters, Sandy Petersen introduced the concept of the Onion Skin: Interlocking layers of information and nested clues that lead the Player Characters from seemingly minor investigations into a missing person to discovering mind-numbingly awful, global conspiracies to destroy the world. Unlike its predecessor games, CoC assumed that most investigators would not survive, alive or sane, and that the only safe way to deal with the vast majority of nasty things described in the rule books was to run away. A well-run CoC campaign should engender a sense of foreboding and inevitable doom in its players. The style and setting of the game, in a relatively modern time period, created an emphasis on real-life settings, character research, and thinking one's way around trouble.

Call of Cthulhu uses the Basic Role-Playing system used by other Chaosium games (first seen in RuneQuest). For as long as they stay functionally healthy and sane, characters grow and develop. Call of Cthulhu does not use levels, but is completely skill-based, with player characters getting better with their skills by succeeding at them. They do not, however, gain "hit points" and do not become significantly harder to kill.

The players take the roles of ordinary people drawn into the realm of the mysterious: detectives, criminals, scholars, artists, war veterans, etc. Often, happenings begin innocently enough, until more and more of the workings behind the scenes are revealed. As the characters learn more of the true horrors of the world and the irrelevance of humanity, their sanity (represented by "Sanity Points", abbreviated SAN) inevitably withers away. The game includes a mechanism for determining how damaged a character's sanity is at any given point; encountering the horrific beings usually triggers a loss of SAN points. To gain the tools they need to defeat the horrors – mystic knowledge and magic – the characters may end up losing some of their sanity, though other means such as pure firepower or simply outsmarting one's opponents also exist. Call of Cthulhu has a reputation as a game in which it is quite common for a player character to die in gruesome circumstances or end up in a mental institution. Unlike most other role-playing games, eventual triumph of the players is not assumed

The Dagon's Lair